Is Blind Recruiting Really as Gender Blind as it’s Supposed to be?

Is Blind Recruiting Really as Gender Blind as it’s Supposed to be?

It’s no secret that gender, diversity and inclusion are central to business as uncertainty dominates headlines and makes waves globally. As gender equality is a topical issue, blind recruiting can help with fair screening to ensure non-discriminative shortlisting, but is it enough? Businesses are vying for attention in ever-crowded marketplaces and, in turn, boardrooms are determined to attract candidates from the widest talent pools possible to be competitive and ensure the best service for their clients. Research shows 77 percent of CEOs reported having a diversity and inclusion strategy or planning to adopt one in the next 12 months. And the talent these companies want recruit supports this view. PwC research shows 86 percent of female and 74 percent of male millennials consider employers’ policies on diversity, equality and inclusion when deciding what company to work for. However, some view current recruiting processes as imperfect, elitist and exclusionary. These concerns make it important for recruiters to consider innovative strategies for implementing inclusionary recruiting processes to break down barriers and attract candidates from all backgrounds. To do this, there is a need to ensure that nothing in the recruitment process puts up barriers that prevent the best talent from joining a firm. 

Jeanette Maister

Jeanette Maister is managing director – Americas at WCN, a best-in-class global talent acquisition solutions firm. Maister is passionate about data and metrics. Before WCN, Maister was chief operating officer of Global Campus Recruiting at Credit Suisse. Earlier in her career, Maister spent eight years in a variety of campus recruiting leadership roles at Lehman Brothers. She also held positions at IBM in HR, and Gartner, an IT advisory company, as director of Global Talent Acquisition. Maister also serves as a career advisor and coach to MBA and EMBA students at Columbia Business School's Career Management Center. She graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with a BA in psychology and earned her MBA from Columbia Business School.